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NEW POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT | Recovery Support Coordinator | Case Manager

MILWAUKEE - Behavioral Health Programs

Recovery Support Coordinator | Case Manager

POSITION SUMMARY:

Recovery Support Coordination is a strength-based case management model that provides the framework for an individualized plan of care to be developed for each participant. The purpose of Recovery Support Coordination is to assist clients to establish their own path to recovery and ensure the client’s well-being beyond the provision of formal services. It is the expectation of the Behavioral Health Division (BHD) Community Access to Recovery Services (CARS) that the Recovery Support Coordinator (RSC) /Case Manager (CM) will promptly undertake care coordination responsibilities so that the client’s recovery needs will be met in a timely manner. The RSC/CM will coordinate service planning and delivery, as well as help the client to access services. 

Posted:                            June 15, 2017
Application Deadline:   July 31, 2017
Location:                         205 West Highland Ave, Suite 201, MKE, WI 53203

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NEW EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY | Jail Screening Specialist | 3rd Shift

JAIL SCREENING SPECIALIST | 3RD SHIFT

POSITION SUMMARY:

(10pm-6:30am, Saturday-Wednesday schedule)

Screening Specialists are responsible for the day-to-day interviewing of all arrestees booked into the Milwaukee County Criminal Justice Facility as well as the creation of a Pretrial Risk Report for all arrestees interviewed.  Information gathered through the pretrial investigation process is entered into the Milwaukee County Pretrial Service Information System and used to create a Pretrial Risk Report used by judicial officials in the bail setting decision.

Posted:                            May 3, 2017
Application Deadline:   June 15, 2017
Location:                         821 West State Street, MKE, WI 53233

FULL POSITION DESCRIPTION

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NEW POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT | CCS REHAB WORKER | PART TIME

CCS REHAB WORKER | COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY SERVICES | PART TIME

POSITION SUMMARY:

The Rehabilitation Worker will provide guidance and support services for consumers assigned to the agency. The position will offer consumers the opportunity to engage with others through meaningful activities and provide assistance as necessary. This is a high-energy job that requires independence and a desire to help consumers work on their individualized recovery plan.

Posted:                            November 24, 2016
Application Deadline:   December 31, 2016
Location:                         205 West Highland Ave, Suite 201, MKE, WI 53203

FULL POSITION DESCRIPTION

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NEW EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY | CCS Care Coordinator

CCS CARE COORDINATOR | COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY SERVICES

POSITION SUMMARY:

This position is responsible for helping the consumers to understand, navigate, and grow through the CCS program.  This Care Coordinator meets and works with the consumers, service providers, and other team supports that assist in the consumer’s progression through the CCS program.  The Care Coordinator receives consultation from mental health and/or substance abuse professionals while working on the clients individualized recovery plan. 

Posted:                            November 22, 2016
Application Deadline:     December 31, 2016
Location:                         205 West Highland Ave, Suite 201, MKE, WI 53203

FULL POSITION DESCRIPTION

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NEW EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY | Group Facilitator | Milwaukee

GROUP FACILITATOR |  CBP AND MEN'S EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE PROGRAMS

POSITION SUMMARY:

Individuals considered for this position will be required to become trained in curriculums including but not limited to Thinking for a Change (T4C), Cognitive Behavioral Interventions for Substance Abuse (CBI-SA), and Substance Abuse and Men’s Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Model (SA-M-TREM). Groups will consist of 8-16 individuals and fidelity to the models must be ensured.

There is a shift differential included for working 2nd shift

Posted:                            November 14, 2016
Application Deadline:   December 15, 2016
Location:                         821 West State Street, Room 417, Milwaukee, WI 53233

FULL POSITION DESCRIPTION

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NEW JOB POSTING | Jail Screening Specialist | 2nd Shift | MKE

JAIL SCREENING SPECIALIST | 2ND SHIFT (2:30-11PM) 

POSITION SUMMARY:

The Jail Screening Specialist is a professional position responsible for conducting interviews and assessments of inmates in Milwaukee County detention facilities.  The Jail Screening Specialist provides a detailed and objective report to the Court, Prosecution and Defense to assist in the bail decision.  This includes the defendant’s assessed risk level, and recommendations related to bail and release conditions.  The Jail Screening Specialist also assists in the process of releasing individuals from custody to pretrial supervision and in providing more in depth assessment to identify individuals who may be eligible for a Deferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA).

There is a shift differential included for working 2nd shift

Posted:                            November 14, 2016
Application Deadline:   December 15, 2016
Location:                         821 West State Street, Room 417, Milwaukee, WI 53233

FULL POSITION DESCRIPTION

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NEW JOB POSTING | Case Manager | Repeat Intoxicated Driver Intervention Program

REPEAT INTOXICATED DRIVER INTERVENTION PROGRAM CASE MANAGER

POSITION SUMMARY:

JusticePoint, Inc. is a private non-profit agency with a commitment to social justice. The target population includes adults who may have serious and persistent mental health and/or substance abuse disorders, may be considered indigent, or be at risk for re-arrest, and are involved in the criminal justice system.  Case Managers will provide service at various points of contact including the courts, county jail, state mental health institutes, and the community. 

Posted:                            November 4, 2016
Application Deadline:   December 15, 2016
Location:                         821 West State Street, Room 417, Milwaukee, WI 53233

FULL POSITION DESCRIPTION

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ORIGINAL STORY | PRISON POLICY INSTITUTE | CLICK HERE

Detaining the Poor:   

How money bail perpetuates an endless cycle of poverty and jail time

By Bernadette Rabuy and Daniel Kopf
May 10, 2016
Press release  

In addition to the 1.6 million people incarcerated in federal and state prisons, there are 646,000 people locked up in more than 3,000 local jails throughout the U.S. Seventy percent of these people in local jails are being held pretrial— meaning they have not yet been convicted of a crime and are legally presumed innocent. One reason that the unconvicted population in the U.S. is so large is because our country largely has a system of money bail, in which theconstitutional principle of innocent until proven guilty only really applies to the well off. With money bail, a defendant is required to pay a certain amount of money as a pledged guarantee he will attend future court hearings. If he is unable to come up with the money either personally or through a commercial bail bondsman, he can be incarcerated from his arrest until his case is resolved or dismissed in court.

Figure 1. Since the 1980s, there has been a significant, nationwide move away from courts allowing non-financial forms of pretrial release (such as release on own recognizance) to money bail, although this does vary substantially depending on jurisdiction. This chart illustrates the possible paths from arrest to pretrial detention. Almost all defendants will have the opportunity to be released pretrial if they meet certain conditions, and only a very small number of defendants will be denied a bail bond, mainly because a court finds that individual to be dangerous or a flight risk. The only national data on pretrial detention that we are aware of comes from the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Felony Defendants in Large Urban Counties series. Nationally, in 2009, 34% of defendants were detained pretrial for the inability to post money bail. This report focuses on this important population: those who are detained pretrial because they could not afford money bail....

CLICK TO READ FULL STORY BY THE PRISON POLICY INSTITUTE

 

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NYTimes | For Police, A Playbook for Conflicts Involving Mental Illness

New York Times | April 25, 2016 | By: Erica Goode

LINK TO ORIGINAL STORY

PORTLAND, Ore. - The 911 caller had reported a man with a samurai sword lunging at people on the waterfront.

It was evening, and when the police arrived, they saw the man pacing the beach and called to him.  He responded by throwing a rock at the embankment where they stood.

They shouted to him from a sheriff's boat; he threw another rock.  They told him to drop the sword; he said he would kill them.  He started to leave the beach, and after warning him, they shot him in the leg with a beanbag gun.  He turned back, still carrying the four-foot blade.

In another city - or in Portland itself not that long ago - the next step would almost certainly have been a direct confrontation and, had the man not put down the weapon, the use of lethal force....

CLICK FOR FULL STORY

 

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VOX | How America's criminal justice system became the country's mental health system

by German Lopez on March 1, 2016

Kevin Earley of Fairfax County, Virginia, knows too well what it's like to be on the bad side of a police officer as a person with bipolar disorder — scared you're about to die.

Prior to the encounter, Kevin's father, Pete, called police when Kevin, now 36, acted violently on a night in 2005. Kevin refused to surrender and tried to flee, thinking police were trying to hurt him. Officers blasted him twice with a Taser, shocking him with up to 50,000 volts of electricity each time.

"I was very delusional, erratic, confrontational, and paranoid," Kevin said. "So when they came, they tased me."

It was not Kevin's first run-in with police — and it wouldn't be his last. But it's the one Kevin and his father share as one of his worst experiences....

CLICK HERE TO READ FULL ARTICLE

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NPR - WATCH: Republicans — Then And Now — Talking About Drug Addiction

By: Eyder Peralta

If you pay attention to way Republican presidential candidates are talking about drug abuse, it seems vastly different from the way the party leaders of the past talked about the issue.

Perhaps the new, more compassionate stance was synthesized best by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie during Saturday's GOP debate.

Christie touted his record of keeping drug abusers out of jails.

"This is a disease. It's not a moral failing," Christie said...

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/02/08/466034600/watch-republicans-then-and-now-talking-about-drug-addiction 

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New Juvenile Detention Alternative Programs in Manitowoc County

JusticePoint was recently notified that we were selected as the new vendor for Manitowoc County's Juvenile Detention Alternative Programs beginning March 1 of this year.  JusticePoint is thrilled to be the newest partner to the County's already standout series of programs directed at mitigating the criminogenic risk of youth in the juvenile justice system.  Starting March 1, JusticePoint will begin operation of the following programs for Manitowoc County:

  • Youth Wellness Center
  • Intensive Supervision Program
  • Youth Tracking Program

JusticePoint is currently hiring to fill case management positions in each of the aforementioned programs.  If you or someone you know is interested in applying or for more information on these exciting new programs, please visit the jobs page on our website at http://www.justicepoint.org/jobs/.

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Starting Point Joins The Difference Principle Network as a Sister Company to JusticePoint

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Starting Point Joins The Difference Principle Network of Social Justice Nonprofits

 

Milwaukee, WI, January 1, 2016:  Starting Point, Inc., the Greater Milwaukee Area’s premier youth-focused substance abuse prevention and intervention organization, has joined The Difference Principle, Inc.’s network of Social Justice nonprofit organizations.  The Difference Principle will provide administrative and back office support to Starting Point, allowing Starting Point to more effectively deploy their resources to fulfil their mission of building healthy communities through innovative substance abuse prevention and intervention services.

Starting Point has been delivering pioneering alcohol, drug, and tobacco prevention services to the Ozaukee County community since 1975.  Services delivered include school-based prevention curricula, AODA assessments, educational groups for parents and youth, crisis intervention, and various opportunities and alternatives for justice-involved individuals.

Starting Point leads a variety of community-based awareness and prevention efforts, including Ozaukee County’s Red Ribbon Campaign and the Ozaukee County Heroin Task Force.  In 2016, Starting Point will open its first Sober Living House in Saukville, WI, providing a safe and substance-free living environment for individuals in the early phases of their sobriety journey.

The Difference Principle is a Milwaukee-based nonprofit organization that serves as the parent company for a network of social justice focused nonprofit organizations.  By providing administrative oversight, fiscal management, human resources, IT, fund development, and contract management services, The Difference Principle will create opportunities for Starting Point’s executive management team to focus on enhancing and expanding the extraordinary impact the agency has on the people and communities of the Greater Milwaukee Area.

Others members of The Difference Principle network include criminal justice organization JusticePoint, policy/research entity Justice Initiatives Institute, and disability law firm Third Coast Legal.

For more information on Starting Point, visit http://www.startingpointwi.org.  For more information on The Difference Principle, visit http://www.differenceprinciple.org.

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Justice Department set to free 6,000 prisoners, largest one-time release | Washington Post

From the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/justice-department-about-to-free-6000-prisoners-largest-one-time-release/2015/10/06/961f4c9a-6ba2-11e5-aa5b-f78a98956699_story.html 

By Sari Horwitz October 6  

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades, according to U.S. officials.

The inmates from federal prisons nationwide will be set free by the department’s Bureau of Prisons between Oct. 30 and Nov. 2. About two-thirds of them will go to halfway houses and home confinement before being put on supervised release. About one-third are foreign citizens who will be quickly deported, officials said.

The early releases follow action by the U.S. Sentencing Commission — an independent agency that sets sentencing policies for federal crimes — that reduced the potential punishment for future drug offenders last year and then made that change retroactive.

The commission’s action is separate from an effort by President Obama to grant clemency to certain nonviolent drug offenders, an initiative that has resulted in the early release of 89 inmates.

The panel estimated that its change in sentencing guidelines eventually could result in 46,000 of the nation’s approximately 100,000 drug offenders in federal prison qualifying for early release. The 6,000 figure, which has not been reported previously, is the first tranche in that process.

“The number of people who will be affected is quite exceptional,” said Mary Price, general counsel for Families Against Mandatory Minimums, an advocacy group that supports sentencing reform.

[The U.S. is set to release thousands of prisoners early. Here’s where they’re headed.]

The Sentencing Commission estimated that an additional 8,550 inmates would be eligible for release between this Nov. 1 and Nov. 1, 2016.

The releases are part of a shift in the nation’s approach to criminal justice and drug sentencing that has been driven by a bipartisan consensus that mass incarceration has failed and should be reversed.

Along with the commission’s action, the Justice Department has instructed its prosecutors not to charge low-level, nonviolent drug offenders who have no connection to gangs or large-scale drug organizations with offenses that carry severe mandatory sentences.

The U.S. Sentencing Commission voted unanimously for the reduction last year after holding two public hearings in which members heard testimony from then-Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., federal judges, federal public defenders, state and local law enforcement officials, and sentencing advocates. The panel also received more than 80,000 public comment letters, with the overwhelming majority favoring the change.

Holder supported the change, but he proposed more restrictive criteria that would exclude people who had used weapons or had significant criminal histories. But the Sentencing Commission decided to leave the decisions to individual judges.

Congress did not act to disapprove the change to the sentencing guidelines, so it became effective on Nov. 1, 2014. The commission then gave the Justice Department a year to prepare for the huge release of inmates.

The policy change is referred to as “Drugs Minus Two.” Federal sentencing guidelines rely on a numeric system based on different factors, including the defendant’s criminal history, the type of crime, whether a gun was involved and whether the defendant was a leader in a drug group.

The sentencing panel’s change decreased the value attached to most drug-trafficking offenses by two levels, regardless of the type of drug or the amount.

An average of about two years is being shaved off eligible prisoners’ sentences under the change. Although some of the inmates who will be released have served decades, on average they will have served 8 1/2 years instead of 10 1/2 , according to a Justice Department official.

“Even with the Sentencing Commission’s reductions, drug offenders will have served substantial prison sentences,” Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates said. “Moreover, these reductions are not automatic. Under the commission’s directive, federal judges are required to carefully consider public safety in deciding whether to reduce an inmate’s sentence.”

[The painful price of aging in prison]

In each case, inmates must petition a judge, who decides whether to grant the sentencing reduction. Judges nationwide are granting about 70 sentence reductions per week, Justice Department officials said. Some of the inmates already have been sent to halfway houses.

In some cases, federal judges have denied inmates’ requests for early release. For example, U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth recently denied requests from two top associates of Rayful Edmond III, one of the District’s most notorious drug kingpins.

Federal prosecutors did not oppose a request by defense lawyers to have the associates, Melvin D. Butler and James Antonio Jones, released early in November. But last month, Lamberth denied the request, which would have cut about two years from each man’s projected 28 1/2 -year sentence.

“The court struggles to understand how the government could condone the release of Butler and Jones, each convicted of high-
level, sophisticated and violent drug-trafficking offenses,” Lamberth wrote. The Edmond group imported as much as 1,700 pounds of Colombian cocaine a month into the city in the 1980s, according to court papers.

Critics, including some federal prosecutors, judges and police officials, have raised concerns that allowing so many inmates to be released at the same time could cause crime to increase.

But Justice officials pointed to the large number of inmates who will be deported and to a study last year that found that the recidivism rate for offenders who were released early after changes in crack-cocaine sentencing guidelines in 2007 was not significantly different from the rate for offenders who completed their sentences.

[The issue that Obama and the Koch brothers actually agree on]

“Prison officials and probation officers are working hard to ensure that returning offenders are adequately supervised and monitored,” Yates said.

Federal prison costs represent about one-third of the Justice Department’s $27 billion budget. The U.S. population has grown by about a third since 1980, but the federal prison population has increased by about 800 percent and federal prisons are operating at nearly 40 percent over capacity, Justice officials said.

Last week, a group of senators introduced a bipartisan criminal justice reform bill, the first such legislation in decades. Although some advocates say it doesn’t go far enough, the measure, which is supported by a coalition that includes the Koch brothers and the American Civil Liberties Union, would shorten the length of ­mandatory-minimum drug sentences that were part of the tough-on-crime laws passed during the war on drugs in the 1980s and 1990s.

If passed by Congress and signed by Obama, the reforms would apply retroactively, allowing inmates who were previously incarcerated under mandatory minimums an opportunity for release.

“It’s a remarkable moment,” Price said. “Over the past several years, the tone of the discussion about incarceration has changed dramatically. We have come to the realization that our punitive approach to drug crimes is not working and has produced significant injustices.”

Spencer S. Hsu contributed to this report.

Sari Horwitz covers the Justice Department and criminal justice issues nationwide for The Washington Post, where she has been a reporter for 30 years.

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NACo | County Jails at a Crossroad - Milwaukee, WI

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NACo | County Jails at a Crossroad - Milwaukee, WI

Reposted from: http://www.naco.org/resources/county-jails-crossroads-milwaukee-county-wi

Read the Full Report: http://www.naco.org/resources/county-jails-crossroads

The Opportunity for Change

Milwaukee County’s Community Justice Council was formed in 2008 with the goal of ensuring “a fair, efficient, and effective justice system that enhances public safety and quality of life in our community.” As part of that goal, the county applied for and was chosen to be part of the National Institute of Corrections’ Evidence-Based Decision Making in Local Criminal Justice Systems initiative. As leaders began to examine their local criminal justice system, they began to learn about evidence-based pretrial reforms and realized Milwaukee County’s pretrial system could be improved upon. “Our pretrial supervision back then was one size fits all,” says Chief Judge Jeffrey Kremers. “If you were released pretrial, you were monitored by our agency and everyone got the same supervision regardless of their circumstances. We were overusing resources and monitoring fewer people.”

Milwaukee County's Model

Milwaukee County contracts with a non-profit organization called JusticePoint, Inc., to handle the majority of its pretrial services. These services begin with a screening of all individuals who are booked into the jail and face a bail decision to assess their risk for pretrial misconduct, which is defined as missing court or being rearrested while on pretrial release. Screenings take place 24 hours a day, seven days a week, using the Milwaukee County Pretrial Risk Assessment Instrument, the county’s intake interview and the county’s pretrial praxis, which recommends supervision conditions based on a person’s risk level and other predictors...

Reposted from: http://www.naco.org/resources/county-jails-crossroads-milwaukee-county-wi

Read the Full Report: http://www.naco.org/resources/county-jails-crossroads

 

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Why Bail Reform Should Be an LGBT Movement Priority

Source: http://huff.to/1MgphPh 

In the spring of 2011, I received a call from a colleague about 11 transgender women of color who were arrested while walking down Roosevelt Avenue in Jackson Heights, Queens. The women had spent the Saturday night out with friends dancing at the local gay clubs and were walking home in groups. Though many of us grow up being told to walk in groups to stay safe, for people of color, particularly transgender women of color, walking in groups often invites police attention...

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JSOnline | Ride Buses for Free Tuesday in Milwaukee, Waukesha, Ozaukee, Washington Counties

Originally Posted at: http://www.jsonline.com/news/milwaukee/ride-buses-for-free-tuesday-in-milwaukee-waukesha-ozaukee-washington-counties-b99489044z1-301417121.html 

If you regularly ride a bus in the greater Milwaukee area, you're in for a gift Tuesday. And if you don't ride, this may be the day to try it.

That's because all rides are free for the day.

The one-day perk is part of the Greater Milwaukee Foundation's centennial Gifts to the Community, and it's good for rides on public transit in Milwaukee, Waukesha, Ozaukee and Washington counties.

The foundation has been giving out gifts each month. Last month, for example, it paid for admission to the Domes in Milwaukee for two days.

The free rides Tuesday are offered on the Milwaukee County Transit SystemWaukesha Metro Transit,Waukesha County TransitWashington County Commuter ExpressWashington County Shared Ride Taxi,West Bend Taxi Service and Hartford City Taxi.

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Two New Publications on Disability Insurance

The Center for Budget and Policy Priorities conducts research and tracks statistics on Social Security disability programs, and they’ve just updated two important publications on disability insurance (DI). First, the Chart Book presents nearly two dozen graphs that illustrate key DI facts: why it's important, why the DI rolls have grown, who receives benefits, and what financing issues the program faces.  Second, their primer (or "Policy Basic"), is a short backgrounder on the Disability Insurance program and why it's important. Both publications are available here:

http://www.cbpp.org/blog/the-basics-of-disability-insurance-updated

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